Trombone

The slide is the oldest method of changing the air-column of a brass instrument. A very popular instrument today, the trombone is used in many types of musical groups including concert, symphonic, marching, military, jazz, rock, and pop idioms. St. John’s Music carries the top three brands in Canada. Yamaha, Accent, and Bach

Trombone

There are many different types of Trombones, just like people, each one has its own unique approach.

Tenor Trombone

Tenor Trombone

The most popular trombone for beginners. The most widely used trombone in classical, jazz, and popular music. It is, in fact, one of the earliest and least-changed wind instrument designs currently in use. The tenor trombone has a broad, sonorous tone which can both blend well with horns and keep pace with the trumpets.

F Attachment

F Attachment

Exactly the same as the tenor trombone but with a valve which shifts the key of the instruments from B-flat to F. The F attachment is simply an extension of the tubing on a trombone. This extra feature allows lower notes to be played more easily and also gives the slide a new set of positions.

Bass Trombone

Bass Trombone

The bass trombone has a large bore and bell with deeper tone and a lower register. The bass trombone is essential voice in trombone sections, and plays an important role in brass bands, big bands, orchestras, jazz, and other ensembles.

Valve Trombone

Valve Trombone

The valve trombone is basically a standard tenor trombone with valves rather than a movable slide. It provides a convenient way for players who are used to playing valves to “double” on the trombone.

Alto Trombone

Alto Trombone

Though once the standard first-chair trombone of the orchestra, the alto trombone has been superseded by the tenor due to the changing needs of the modern symphony orchestra. The alto is still the instrument of choice for delicate passages in compositions by Mozart and his peers.